FDA grants Priority Review to Tecentriq as adjuvant treatment in NSCLC indication

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FDA has accepted the Biologics License Application and granted Priority Review for Tecentriq (atezolizumab) as adjuvant treatment following surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy for people with non-small cell lung cancer whose tumors express PD-L1≥1%, as determined by an FDA-approved test. 

Tecentriq is sponsored by Genentech.

The FDA is reviewing the application under the Real-Time Oncology Review pilot program, which aims to explore a more efficient review process to ensure safe and effective treatments are available to patients as early as possible. 

The FDA is expected to make a decision on approval by December 1, 2021.

This application is based on disease-free survival results from an interim analysis of the phase III IMpower010 study, the first and only phase III study of a cancer immunotherapy to demonstrate positive results in the adjuvant lung cancer setting. 

The study showed that treatment with Tecentriq following surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy reduced the risk of disease recurrence or death (DFS) by 34% (hazard ratio [HR]=0.66, 95% CI: 0.50-0.88) in people with stage II-IIIA NSCLC whose tumors express PD-L1≥1%, compared with best supportive care. 

In this population, median DFS was not yet reached for Tecentriq compared with 35.3 months for BSC. Follow-up on the IMpower010 trial will continue with planned analyses of DFS in the overall intent-to-treat population, including Stage IB patients, which at the time of analysis did not cross the threshold, and overall survival data, which were immature at the time of interim analysis. 

Safety data for Tecentriq were consistent with its known safety profile and no new safety signals were identified. Results from the IMpower010 trial were presented at the 2021 ASCO annual meeting.

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