Annals of Unintended Consequences: How FDA regulations undermine the biosimilar marketplace and the BPCIA

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on print

In March 2010, as part of Affordable Care Act, Congress passed a well-conceived and critical legislative bill, the Biologic Pricing and Competition Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA)i. Despite its intentions, BPCIA has been instituted so that it complicates prescribing while increasing health care costs and reducing competition, rather than resulting in the anticipated benefits.

To access this subscriber-only content please log in or renew you subscription.

Looking for IP Login? Our IP Login system is now automatic. If your institution has a site license, please log in from on site or via your VPN to access this content.

Login Subscribe
Distinguished Professor of Medicine; Associate director for clinical research and director, GI Oncology; Rutgers Cancer Institute; Director of oncology research, RWJBarnabas Health
Executive director, Oncology Pharmacy Services & Research Shared Resource, Rutgers Cancer Institute
Table of Contents

YOU MAY BE INTERESTED IN

NIH may be “constrained” in investigating sexual misconduct at NIH-funded institutions once alleged perpetrators are no longer affiliated with these institutions, NIH officials implied in their response to a congressional inquiry on sexual misconduct (The Cancer Letter, Sept. 24, 2021).

On Dec. 8, 2020, a month after losing the election, then-president Donald Trump announced his intent to name 26 people to advisory boards across the federal government. Among them were three would-be members of the National Cancer Advisory Board, and in the months following, these three appointments—which have been blocked and ultimately terminated by the...

As we approach the 23rd anniversary of The March, The Cancer Letter archives offer a unique way to reflect on the leadup to—and events of—the day. In October, 1997, The Cancer Letter dedicated the entirety of what was then an 8-page publication to a lengthy analysis of the vision for The March. Then, one year later, those same 8 pages were trained on the event—the speeches, the attendance, the music, and more.
Distinguished Professor of Medicine; Associate director for clinical research and director, GI Oncology; Rutgers Cancer Institute; Director of oncology research, RWJBarnabas Health
Executive director, Oncology Pharmacy Services & Research Shared Resource, Rutgers Cancer Institute

Login