publication date: Apr. 26, 2019

Conversation with The Cancer Letter

Collins: “Not every one of these investigations is going to reveal something bad, but some of them will”

Dr. Francis S. Collins, Director of NIH.

Francis Collins

Director, NIH

 

Stealing data obtained through the NIH peer review process is the most egregious of the cluster of rogue behaviors revealed through ongoing investigations of diversion of intellectual property, NIH Director Francis Collins said in testimony before the Senate Appropriations Committee April 11.

“Diverting intellectual property that was rightly the property of the institution where [the researchers] are working to China, may be most egregious of all, because it violates such an important principle for us, taking grants that they are asked to review as part of the peer-review process, and distributing those to another country, even before those grants have gone through the full review process, giving, therefore, an opportunity for somebody else’s ideas to be stolen.”

 

The exchange between Collins and Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) follows:

 

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO):

Thank you, Dr. Collins. Why don’t we talk a little bit about the efforts you’ve made on the concern about foreign involvement, about duplicate labs in other countries, and information being shared that shouldn’t be, and then what we’re going to do about it.

Francis Collins:

I’d be glad to do that. We are deeply … Continue reading Collins: “Not every one of these investigations is going to reveal something bad, but some of them will”

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