20160129 - Jan 29, 2016
ISSUE 4 – JAN. 29, 2016PDF



Slamming the Door

How Al Gilman Taught Texas A Lesson in Science

Alfred Gilman’s approach to distributing public funds wasn’t particularly difficult to understand: he wanted to pay for the best science available. Period.

The pot of money entrusted to Gilman was vast. In 2007, Texas voters approved the largest investment in cancer research outside the federal government: $3 billion, to be spent over 10 years. By way of comparison, NCI grants going to Texas researchers and institutions added up to $240 million a year. CPRIT more than doubled that money. Only Texans were eligible to apply.

Gilman accepted the CPRIT job at age 68, because he thought that it would be a significant contribution to a major research effort, and a nice way to finish out a long career.

Sixty-Nine Cancer Centers Urge HPV VaccinationIn an unprecedented move, 69 NCI-designated cancer centers have come together to advocate for HPV vaccination as a preventive measure against many HPV-related cancers.

“HPV vaccination is our best defense in stopping HPV infection in our youth and preventing HPV-related cancers in our communities,” the centers said in a consensus statement published Jan. 27. “The HPV vaccine is cancer prevention.”

PCORI Passes $1.2 Billion in Total Research Funding

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute approved $70 million for nine new patient-centered research projects focused on conditions including ductal carcinoma in situ, diabetes, chronic lung disease and migraines.

With these latest awards, PCORI has now approved or awarded more than $1.2 billion in research funding.

In Brief

  • Minesh Mehta named deputy director at Miami Cancer Institute
  • Carmen Solórzano named chief of Division of Surgical Oncology at Vanderbilt
  • Judy Keen named ASTRO director of scientific affairs
  • Tara Yates joins Wistar Institute as director of communications
  • Ovarian Cancer National Alliance and Ovarian Cancer Research Fund merge
  • UC San Diego Health selects e+CancerCare to operate Chula Vista radiation center
  • Harvard Business School launches Precision Trials Challenge
Drugs and Targets

  • FDA expands Opdivo-Yervoy Label with accelerated approval in melanoma
  • Halaven approved for unresectable or metastatic liposarcoma
  • Zepatier approved for treatment of chronic hepatitis C
20160122 - Jan 22, 2016
ISSUE 3 – JAN. 22, 2016PDF



Biden’s Cancer Moonshot to Focus
On Bioinformatics and Data Sharing

The Obama administration will find the money to create a comprehensive oncology bioinformatics system, Vice President Joe Biden pledged Jan. 19 at a meeting of international cancer experts at the World Economic Forum in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland.

Biden, whose son Beau died of brain cancer in May 2015 at age 46, is leading the White House “moonshot” program, which was announced by President Barack Obama during his final State of the Union address Jan. 12 (The Cancer Letter, Jan. 15).

Obama is expected to announce the details of funding the moonshot in his budget proposal Feb. 9.

 Biden: Cancer Moonshot Seeks Quantum Leaps, Not Incremental Change

The text of Vice President Joe Biden’s Jan. 19 remarks at a World Economic Forum meeting of international cancer experts in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, follows:

Almost everyone in the world, as you all know, has a family member who’s had cancer. Every year, around the world, 14 million people are diagnosed with cancer and 8 million people succumb to it, die, from cancer.

And like many of you, I have experienced in my family the dreaded C-word that I think is the most frightening word that most people—as these docs and scientists can tell you—that anyone wants to hear walking out of a doctor’s office.

     

    Guest Editorial

    The False Allure of The Cancer Cure

    By Robert Cook-Deegan

    Over the past century, we have had many wars on cancer, and now we have a national “moonshot” to be spearheaded by Vice President Joe Biden, announced in President Barack Obama’s Jan. 12 State of the Union Address.

    In 1937, even as Congress was establishing the National Cancer Institute as the first of the National Institutes of Health, the American Committee to Combat Cancer was organizing the “Women’s Field Army” to mobilize against cancer, especially uterine, ovarian, and breast cancers. The main argument was that the nation was spending vastly more per person affected, and per death, on polio than it was on cancer. It was framed as a war.

      In Brief

      • James Willson named chief scientific officer of CPRIT

      • Mary-Claire King wins the Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

      • Mylin Torres named director of Glenn Family Breast Center at Winship
      • New York Genome Center receives $100 million grant from the Simons Foundation and Carson Family Charitable Trust

      • MD Anderson Cancer Center and AbbVie form immuno-oncology collaboration

      Drugs and Targets

      • Venetoclax receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation from FDA

      • FDA grants Priority Review to lenvatinib

      20160115 - Jan 15, 2016
      ISSUE 2 – JAN. 15, 2016PDF



      Obama Announces Moonshot to Cure Cancer

      President Barack Obama announced a moonshot aimed at curing cancer, a project to be led by Vice President Joe Biden.

      The United States can do “so much more,” Obama said in his seventh and final State of the Union address Jan. 12. “Last year, Vice President Biden said that with a new moonshot, America can cure cancer. Last month, he worked with this Congress to give scientists at the National Institutes of Health the strongest resources they’ve had over a decade.

      “Tonight, I’m announcing a new national effort to get it done. And because he’s gone to the mat for all of us, on so many issues over the past 40 years, I’m putting Joe in charge of mission control. For the loved ones we’ve all lost, for the family we can still save—let’s make America the country that cures cancer once and for all.”

       When Moonshots Collide

      Did Patrick Soon-Shiong attempt to scoop President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address?

      Several days before Obama announced the federal government’s moonshot to cure cancer, Soon-Shiong put out a draft press release, claiming that the White House, NIH, FDA and pharmaceutical companies have united in “Cancer MoonShot 2020,” an immunotherapy clinical trials program he devised.

      Soon-Shiong, founder and CEO of NantWorks and the Chan Soon-Shiong Institute of Molecular Medicine, ultimately announced his moonshot on Jan. 11, a day before Obama announced his.

       Conversation with The Cancer Letter

      Soon-Shiong Says FDA & NCI are Onboard For His Moonshot; Feds Deny Involvement

      Government agencies said the biotechnology billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong had overstated the extent of their involvement in “Cancer MoonShot 2020,” the immunotherapy clinical trials program he put together.

      In an in-depth conversation with Matthew Bin Han Ong, a reporter with The Cancer Letter, Soon-Shiong said that while his program doesn’t seek federal funds, it has the support of NCI and FDA officials.

      Soon-Shiong said he and Vice President Joe Biden met to discuss their interlocking missions and are now pursuing them.

      USPSTF Recommends Biennial Mammography Screening For Women Ages 50-74

      The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force published its final recommendation statement on screening for breast cancer, delivering a B rating for mammography screening every two years in women between ages 50 and 74.

      The task force also recommended selectively offering mammography to women below age 50, saying that the decision to begin that screening should be an individual one. The USPSTF gave this age group a C recommendation.

      “Women who place a higher value on the potential benefit than the potential harms may choose to begin biennial screening between the ages of 40 and 49 years,” the task force wrote in its recommendations.

       Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids Demands Recall of Gold Standard Accreditation of U.S. Chamber of Commerce

      The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids said the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is undeserving of its Gold Standard accreditation by the CEO Roundtable on Cancer, saying it should be rescinded because of the trade group’s lobbying efforts against tobacco regulations.

      In Brief

      • Leonard Zon receives Knudsen cancer genetics award from NCI
      • Amy McKee named acting deputy office director at FDA OHOP
      • Paul Kluetz appointed associate director of clinical science at FDA OHOP
      • Dean Tsarwhas named medical director at Northwestern Medicine Lake Forest Hospital
      • Rafat Abonour named medical liaison for the International Myeloma Foundation
      • Ravi Salgia joins City of Hope as chair of Department of Medical Oncology
      • FASEB publishes recommendations for research reproducibility
      • COA elects new board and executive committee members
      Drugs and Targets

      • Blincyto receives conditional approval from Health Canada
      • FDA grants priority review to venetoclax in CLL
      • Sorrento Therapeutics and Karolinska Institutet form collaboration
      • Eisai submits MAA to European Medicines Agency for lenvatinib
      • MD Anderson and DelMar Pharmaceuticals form collaboration
      • Debiopharm International SA collaborates in EORTC trial