Issue 12 - Mar 23, 2018
  • Right to Try edges closer to becoming federal law

    Libertarians rejoice, but can it solve compassionate use problems?

    Few Washington insiders doubt that a bill that allows terminally ill patients to circumvent FDA as they pursue Hail Mary pass therapies will become the law of the land.

    Collectively known as the “Right to Try” law, the legislation has been passed by both chambers of Congress. The bills, which bear the names of four patients—Trickett Wendler, Frank Mongiello, Jordan McLinn, and Matthew Bellina—are the culmination of years of intense lobbying by conservative groups and patient activists.

  • Conversation with the Cancer Letter

    NYU’s Caplan: Right to Try laws are meaningless, empty hot air, unethical, and utterly ineffective

    The right-to-try bills passed by Congress would remove FDA’s expanded access mandate and leave patients at greater risk, said Arthur Caplan, the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding director of the Division of Medical Ethics at the New York University School of Medicine.

  • Conversation with the Cancer Letter

    Goldwater’s Coleman: Right to Try patients don’t need permission from feds to save their own lives

    Patients and their doctors should be able to make treatment decisions without involvement from the federal government, said Starlee Coleman, senior policy advisor for the Goldwater Institute, a libertarian think tank that lobbied successfully for widespread adoption of right-to-try laws.

  • How CMS intends to pay for next generation sequencing

    Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services March 16 published the final National Coverage Determination that will pay for next generation sequencing in a broad range of cancers.

  • Congressional omnibus gives NIH a surprisingly hefty $3 billion raise

    Congress March 22 passed a budget that gives a stunning $3 billion increase to NIH and a $275 million boost to NCI.

  • In Brief

    • Robert Redfield to be named CDC director
    • UAMS to offer Arkansas’ first-ever radiation oncology residency program
    • Andrew Aplin named first Kalbach-Newton professor at Thomas Jefferson
    • Jennifer Dorazio named Assistant director for administration at WVU
    • Cofactor Genomics announces collaboration with NCI
    • AbbVie and the International Myeloma Foundation partner to study role of a genetic mutation in multiple myeloma
    • Vanderbilt and Boehringer Ingelheim expand collaboration
  • TCCL Logo

  • Clinical Roundup

    • BioPharma publishes phase III COLUMBUS data of encorafenib and binimetinib
    • AVEO Oncology publishes long-term follow-up results from TIVO-1 Extension Study in TKI refractory RCC
    • Finasteride shown to prevent prostate cancer for up to 16 years
    • Machines see the future of patients diagnosed with brain tumors
  • Drugs and Targets

    • Novartis’s Tasigna approved for children with rare form of leukemia
    • FDA approves Adcetris for adults with previously untreated stage III or IV classical Hodgkin lymphoma
    • University of Maryland certified for CAR T-cell therapy in lymphoma
Issue 11 - Mar 16, 2018
  • Do patients know best? Industry, NCI committing dollars to studying patient-reported outcomes

    Researchers are coming to the conclusion that cancer patients are the best authority on how therapies affect them.

    Over the past few years, about 20 NCI trials and over 125 industry studies have incorporated direct reports of symptomatic adverse events by cancer patients through an NCI program.

  • Conversation with the Cancer Letter

    Basch: Patient-reported outcomes data can make cancer drugs safer, more tolerable

    Fifteen years ago, when Ethan Basch started developing measures for aggregating patient-reported outcomes, many of his colleagues in oncology saw no promise in this enterprise.

  • Conversation with the Cancer Letter

    Porter: I can’t tell you how the Trump administration gets its budget numbers

    John Edward Porter, a long-time key Congressional appropriator and advocate for biomedical research, received the Research!America Legacy Award at an advocacy awards dinner March 14.

  • In Brief

    • President’s Cancer Panel calls for urgent action on drug prices
    • AACR launches initiative focused on health disparities in African-Americans
    • Aurora Health Care & UTHealth join  Strata Oncology
    • PRIMO Lara named deputy chair of SWOG
    • Fox Chase’s Engstrom receives lifetime achievement award for cancer prevention
    • Bellerjeau gets lifetime achievement award from blood and marrow transplant group
  • TCCL Logo

  • Trials and Tribulations

    Rare Cancers, Common Need

    Cancer immunotherapy, and in particular immune checkpoint blockade, has transformed oncology with the potential for durable responses even in patients with metastatic disease. To date, regulatory approvals and clinical trials have focused on the study of these agents in relatively more common tumor types, such as melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, bladder cancer, and kidney cancer, amongst others.

  • Clinical Roundup

    • ASTRO issues updated clinical guideline for whole breast radiation therapy
    • Testicular cancer survivors need screening for long-term heart disease risk
  • Drugs and Targets

    • Erdafitinib gets Breakthrough Therapy designation for metastatic urothelial cancer
    • FDA grants priority review to Merck’s sBLA for Keytruda for advanced cervical cancer
Issue 10 - Mar 9, 2018