Issue 14 - Apr 6, 2018
Issue 13 - Mar 30, 2018
  • New players, new strategies, new resolve raise NIH budget to new level

    On March 14, beneath the soaring ceiling of the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium, Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) faced a constellation of round tables at the Research!America 2018 Advocacy Awards Dinner.

  • Duke faces tightened NIH grant oversight over handling of past scientific misconduct

    NIH has imposed tighter financial controls on researchers at Duke University, citing “ongoing issues” related to management of grants.

  • Conversation with the Cancer Letter

    University of Michigan gets $150 million to recruit cancer researchers, fund research

    Richard and Susan Rogel gave $150 million to the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, which will now be known as the Rogel Cancer Center.

  • AACR announces scientific award winners, new board of directors

    The following cancer researchers and clinicians will be recognized for their scientific achievements during the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

  • An Appreciation

    James Holland, an oncology pioneer, dies at 92

    James Holland became a doctor thanks to what he calls “a series of fortunate mistakes.” The son of a prominent lawyer in Morristown, New Jersey, Holland was raised to go into law, too. But that changed when he took a course in biology at Princeton University and became enthralled with seeing cells under a microscope.

  • In Brief

    • Society of Surgical Oncology gives service award to Wolmark and Fisher
    • NCCN honors contributors to the Improvement of global cancer care
    • City of Hope and Fivepoint partner to bring outpatient center to Orange County
    • Thomas Gallo named ACCC President 2018-2019
    • ONS elects board of directors
    • Cohen joins department of radiation oncology at Fox Chase
  • Funding Opportunities

    DOD publishes funding opportunities for breast and prostate cancer programs

    AACR, AstraZeneca form training partnership

    The American Association for Cancer Research and AstraZeneca formed a partnership to help foster the next generation of cancer research scientists and stimulate innovative research in the areas of DNA Damage Response in cancer and Immuno-Oncology.

  • TCCL Logo

  • Clinical Roundup

    • Sorafenib improves PFS in rare sarcomas, NIH-funded study shows
    • Zejula plus Keytruda shows activity in refractory ovarian cancer
    • Retrospective analysis identifies predictors of dose modification for niraparib
  • Drugs and Targets

    • FDA gives accelerated approval for Blincyto for ALL patients with minimal residual disease
    • Enfortumab vedotin gets breakthrough designation in urothelial cancer
    • FDA approves changes on Hologic’s 3Dimensions Mammography System
    • FDA accepts application for Opdivo plus Yervoy for MSI-H or dMMR metastatic colorectal cancer for priority review
  • CTEP Protocols

    NCI Trials for March

    The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program approved the following clinical research studies last month. 

Issue 12 - Mar 23, 2018
  • Right to Try edges closer to becoming federal law

    Libertarians rejoice, but can it solve compassionate use problems?

    Few Washington insiders doubt that a bill that allows terminally ill patients to circumvent FDA as they pursue Hail Mary pass therapies will become the law of the land.

    Collectively known as the “Right to Try” law, the legislation has been passed by both chambers of Congress. The bills, which bear the names of four patients—Trickett Wendler, Frank Mongiello, Jordan McLinn, and Matthew Bellina—are the culmination of years of intense lobbying by conservative groups and patient activists.

  • Conversation with the Cancer Letter

    NYU’s Caplan: Right to Try laws are meaningless, empty hot air, unethical, and utterly ineffective

    The right-to-try bills passed by Congress would remove FDA’s expanded access mandate and leave patients at greater risk, said Arthur Caplan, the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding director of the Division of Medical Ethics at the New York University School of Medicine.

  • Conversation with the Cancer Letter

    Goldwater’s Coleman: Right to Try patients don’t need permission from feds to save their own lives

    Patients and their doctors should be able to make treatment decisions without involvement from the federal government, said Starlee Coleman, senior policy advisor for the Goldwater Institute, a libertarian think tank that lobbied successfully for widespread adoption of right-to-try laws.

  • How CMS intends to pay for next generation sequencing

    Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services March 16 published the final National Coverage Determination that will pay for next generation sequencing in a broad range of cancers.

  • Congressional omnibus gives NIH a surprisingly hefty $3 billion raise

    Congress March 22 passed a budget that gives a stunning $3 billion increase to NIH and a $275 million boost to NCI.

  • In Brief

    • Robert Redfield to be named CDC director
    • UAMS to offer Arkansas’ first-ever radiation oncology residency program
    • Andrew Aplin named first Kalbach-Newton professor at Thomas Jefferson
    • Jennifer Dorazio named Assistant director for administration at WVU
    • Cofactor Genomics announces collaboration with NCI
    • AbbVie and the International Myeloma Foundation partner to study role of a genetic mutation in multiple myeloma
    • Vanderbilt and Boehringer Ingelheim expand collaboration
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  • Clinical Roundup

    • BioPharma publishes phase III COLUMBUS data of encorafenib and binimetinib
    • AVEO Oncology publishes long-term follow-up results from TIVO-1 Extension Study in TKI refractory RCC
    • Finasteride shown to prevent prostate cancer for up to 16 years
    • Machines see the future of patients diagnosed with brain tumors
  • Drugs and Targets

    • Novartis’s Tasigna approved for children with rare form of leukemia
    • FDA approves Adcetris for adults with previously untreated stage III or IV classical Hodgkin lymphoma
    • University of Maryland certified for CAR T-cell therapy in lymphoma