publication date: Oct. 30, 2015
20151030 - Oct. 30, 2015
ISSUE 40 – OCT. 30, 2015PDF

How Much is a Drug Worth?

A Provocative Model Puts a Price on Benefit

 

Eli Lilly & Co. didn’t ask Dan Goldstein, an oncologist at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, to price their drugs, but he volunteered his services anyway.

Indeed, Lilly Oncology is unlikely in the extreme to concur with the price he proposed for necitumumab, a front-line treatment for locally advanced or metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

Necitumumab, which at this writing is awaiting FDA approval, would be used in combination with a doublet treatment of gemcitabine and cisplatin. This Biologics License Application is all the more important because the treatment of squamous NSCLC hasn’t changed in over 15 years.
 

Conversation with The Cancer Letter

Lilly’s PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators

Visualize Progress and Value in Research

Lilly Oncology has launched a novel value assessment tool that aggregates 40 years of oncology data to measure progress and identify unmet needs in cancer treatments.

The tool, called PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators, or PACE CII, is an effort to visualize progress in cancer treatments with the flexibility to accommodate different cancer subtypes.

PACE CII, launched earlier this year, contains data on 12 solid tumors: namely cancers of the breast, colon, rectum, liver, pancreas, and prostate, as well as melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, gastric cancer, renal cancer, testicular cancer and endometrial cancer.

    Capitol Hill

    Budget Deal Eases Sequestration,

    Includes Medicare Site Neutrality

    Congress passed a two-year budget deal that would raise government spending as well as the debt ceiling.

    The bill includes an $80 billion total budget increase, divided evenly between non-military and military programs, and raises the previous caps set by sequestration. The bill also suspends the debt limit until March 2017.

      A Third of Hospitals Will Drop Out of 340B if HRSA Enacts New Guidance, Survey Finds

      Hospitals serving large populations of low-income patients stand to lose up to seven figures a year in drug discounts if proposed regulatory changes to the 340B program are enacted, the program’s supporters say.

      The Health Resources and Services Administration issued a sweeping guidance that would provide stricter definitions for which patients and entities should be covered.

        In Brief

        • Kathy Helzlsouer named chief medical officer and associate director of NCI DCCPS

        • Thomas Graves and Jeanny Aragon-Ching join Inova cancer institute

        • Friends of Cancer Research honors Marlene Malek, Reps. Diana DeGette and Fred Upton

        • MD Anderson Cancer Center expands Moon Shots Program

        • CureSearch for Children’s Cancer awards $260,000 in grants

        Drugs and Targets

        • Amgen’s Imlygic approved as first U.S. oncolytic viral cancer therapy

        • Imbruvica wins 2015 Prix Galien Award

        • FDA grants priority review to MCNA in certain bladder cancer patients

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