publication date: Aug. 8, 2014
20140808 - Aug. 8, 2014
ISSUE 32 – AUG. 8, 2014PDF



“Wild West” of Molecular Testing?

Caris Engaged in Aggressive Marketing, Improper Medicare Billing, Lawsuit Alleges

It’s possible that molecular testing is doing a lot of good, pinpointing cancer therapies that are most likely (or least likely) to work.

It’s also possible that Medicare is paying for molecular tests that are marketed aggressively despite being based on flimsy evidence.

The latter picture is painted in a suit filed by two former employees of Caris Life Sciences Inc., a company that markets the “Caris Molecular Intelligence” test, a panel of assays previously called “Target Now.”

The whistleblowers allege that their former employer violated the federal anti-kickback statute by routinely waiving some of its fees to induce referrals to federal healthcare programs.

Conversation with The Cancer Letter
Daniel Hayes Leads Tour of Caris Website

Tumor profiling information Caris Life Sciences provides in its reports isn’t backed by sufficient evidence to justify some clinical decisions, said Daniel Hayes, a breast cancer expert at the University of Michigan.

Hayes, the university’s Stuart B. Padnos Professor of Breast Cancer Research and a member of a recent Institute of Medicine committee that issued a report on omics, was clicking through the Caris website as he spoke with Paul Goldberg, editor and publisher of The Cancer Letter.

Caris Officials Respond To Questions Submitted By The Cancer Letter

The Cancer Letter submitted seven questions to Caris Life Sciences regarding their suite of molecular diagnostic tests. 

Questions focused on the costs of the tests, who pays for them, and how much of the information they provide is actionable. 

The Cancer Letter is taking a Summer Break

The next issue will be published Sept. 5.

NCI Launches NCORP with 53 Grants Totaling $465 Million

NCI awarded 53 five-year grants for multi-site clinical trials and care delivery research studies through the NCI Community Oncology Research Program. The program will provide $93 million each year.

photoObituary
Emmanuel Farber, Experimental Pathologist, Dies at Age 95

Emmanuel Farber, a pathologist who made contributions to the understanding of chemical carcinogenesis, died Sunday, Aug. 3. 

photoIn Brief

  • Peter Pisters named CEO of University Health Network in Toronto

  • MD Anderson and Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein form partnership

  • Richard Wahl named head of radiology at Washington University in St. Louis

  • David Espey steps down as acting director of CDC Division of Cancer Prevention and Control

  • Michael Bookman named medical director of US Oncology Research Gynecology Research Program

  • Richard David named professor of urology at UCLA

  • Jennifer Zeitzer named deputy director of FASEB public affairs office

  • Jeffrey Albers named CEO of Blueprint Medicines

  • Conquer Cancer Foundations names Raj Mantena and Aaron Sasson to board of directors

  • Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation receives NIH grant to develop low-cost, portable ultrasound

  • Massachusetts General Hospital receives award from American Hospital Association

  • Association of Community Cancer Centers launches online drug database

  • Bristol-Myers Squibb forms agreement with Leica Biosystems

  • AstraZeneca and Qiagen to collaborate on companion diagnostic

  • Optim Oncology and Urology Centers of Oklahoma join The US Oncology Network

  • FDA and EMA grant orphan designation to AbbVie’s ABT-414

Copyright (c) 2018 The Cancer Letter Inc.