publication date: Nov. 29, 2016

Multiple Myeloma Study met Primary Endpoint of Non-Inferiority Versus Zoledronic Acid in Delaying Skeletal-Related Events

Amgen announced that a phase III study evaluating XGEVA (denosumab) versus zoledronic acid met the primary endpoint of non-inferiority (hazard ratio = 0.98, 95 percent CI, 0.85 – 1.14) in delaying the time to first on-study skeletal-related event in patients with multiple myeloma.

The secondary endpoints of superiority in delaying time to first SRE and delaying time to first-and-subsequent SRE were not met. The hazard ratio of XGEVA versus zoledronic acid for overall survival was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.70 – 1.16).

Adverse events observed in patients treated with XGEVA were generally consistent with the known safety profile of XGEVA. The most common adverse events (greater than 25%) in the XGEVA arm of the study were diarrhea and nausea.

Detailed results will be submitted to a future medical conference and for publication. The Company plans to submit these data to regulatory authorities.)

The ‘482 study was an international, randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial of XGEVA compared with zoledronic acid in the prevention of bone complications in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. In the study, a total of 1,718 patients (859 on each arm) were randomized to receive either subcutaneous XGEVA 120 mg and intravenous placebo every four weeks, or intravenous zoledronic acid 4 mg (adjusted for renal function) … Continue reading CCL Nov 2016 – Study met Primary Endpoint of Non-Inferiority Versus Zoledronic Acid in Delaying Skeletal-Related Events

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