NCI-MATCH keeps enrolling—Targeted mutations are proving to be less common than estimated

NCI-MATCH keeps enrolling—Targeted mutations are proving to be less common than estimated

By Paul Goldberg

The NCI-MATCH trial has met its goal of screening 6,000 patients, but it will not stop there.

The landmark precision medicine trial, which is essentially a collection of single-arm phase II studies, recently cleared four laboratories to identify patients who are getting tested as part of their care. If actionable mutations are found, these patients could become eligible for NCI-MATCH.

MATCH stands for Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice.

NCI-MATCH is being expanded because of an important discovery: In the patients tested so far in NCI-MATCH every tumor gene abnormality has turned out to be less common than expected in this study population. The mutation prevalence rates found in the trial range from zero to 3.47 percent.

This means that tens of thousands of patients will need to be screened to fill rare tumor cohorts, said Keith Flaherty, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group study chair and director of Developmental Therapeutics at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

There are 35 patients in each rare variant subprotocol.

How long can NCI-MATCH keep going?

“We’ll certainly stop when we get the 35 patients in all of our subprotocols,” Flaherty said to The Cancer Letter. “Once we complete all the subprotocols that have been launched, then that will be … Continue reading NCI-MATCH keeps enrolling—Targeted mutations are proving to be less common than estimated