20141121 - Nov 21, 2014
ISSUE 44 – NOV. 21, 2014PDF

As FDA Weighs its Options on Morcellation, Debate Erupts Over Harvard Device Study

Here is what we know: A surgical device used to perform about 100,000 hysterectomies and myomectomies every year in the U.S. has been shown to spread cells from undetected or missed uterine cancers—rapidly upstaging the disease.

And here is what we don’t know: What will FDA do about it?

The agency is under pressure to respond to the growing outcry from patient advocates, who want a ban on the device.

Conversation with The Cancer Letter

Demetri: Morcellation Worsens Outcomes In Patients with Undiagnosed Cancers

As an oncologist who treats sarcoma, George Demetri has seen the adverse consequences of power morcellation, the surgical technique widely used to perform laparoscopic hysterectomies and remove putative fibroids.

In a small minority of cases, these fibroids instead represent unsuspected malignancies—including rare and aggressive leiomyosarcomas—which were impossible to detect prior to the morcellation procedure.

The Cancer Letter is taking a Thanksgiving Break.

The next issue will be published on Dec. 5.

CPRIT Awards 32 Grants

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas awarded 20 grants through its product development program, five grants through its prevention program, and seven recruitment grants through its research program, totaling more than $65 million.

ASCO Proposes Principles For Future Debate on Medicaid

The American Society of Clinical Oncology has proposed a set of principles for shaping future debate of the role of Medicaid.

Obituary

Connie Curran, 67, C-Change Executive Director

Connie Curran, 67, the first executive director of C-Change, died Nov. 10.

C-Change brings together leaders in cancer from the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors. 

Curran was born in Berlin, Wis. She held degrees from the University of Wisconsin, DePaul University, and Northern Illinois University. She also is a graduate of Harvard University Business School’s Owner/President Management program.

FDA News

photoIn Brief

  • D. Gary Gilliland Named President and Director of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

  • Mark Gilbert named chief of Neuro-Oncology Branch at NIH

  • Bert Vogelstein awarded Warren Triennial Prize by Massachusetts General Hospital

  • Susan Mayne appointed director of FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

  • Merck KGaA and Pfizer Inc. to co-develop anti-PD-LI antibody

  • NYU Langone Medical Center and Lutheran Medical Center to create integrated healthcare network

  • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Astellas Pharma Inc. announce three-year collaboration

  • Tapimmune Inc. and Vaccine & Gene Therapy Institute of Florida form partnership

  • St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital opens Marlo Thomas Center

  • Karmanos Cancer Institute honored by Michigan Cancer Consortium

20141114 - Nov 14, 2014
ISSUE 43 – NOV. 14, 2014PDF

CMS Inserts Unprecedented Conditions Into Medicare Coverage of Lung Screening

CT screening of the lungs of current and former heavy smokers is about to become a Medicare benefit.

A proposed decision published Nov. 10 has inserted some unprecedented conditions into its decision to cover screening:

Beneficiaries would have to go through counseling, and health professionals would be required to provide documentation that “shared decision-making” took place. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has never mandated shared decision-making as a gateway to paying for a service.

Guest Editorial

Brawley: CMS Got it Right in Lung Cancer Screening Decision

This week the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services issued a proposed rule stating that the scientific evidence was sufficient to support reimbursement for counseling on the risks and benefits of lung cancer screening as well as lung cancer screening with low dose computed tomography in high risk individuals and once per year. CMS will pay for such services when provided to beneficiaries at high risk for lung cancer and when provided by physicians and centers with specific qualifications.

FDA News

CPRIT Sets Funding Priorities For Rare and Pediatric Cancers

The Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas is adding rare cancers and childhood cancers to its list of funding priorities, according to a draft program report.

The Texas legislature requires the oversight committee of the $300 million state-funded program to establish funding priorities on an annual basis. This is the first time these priorities are articulated and vetted in a public setting, officials say.

CDC: About 8 Million Women Skipped Cervical Cancer Screening in the Past 5 Years

About eight million women ages 21 to 65 years have not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of new cervical cancer cases occur among women who have never or rarely been screened.

2015 Breakthrough Prize Winners Announced at Gala

The Breakthrough Prize Foundation announced the recipients of its prizes in life sciences and fundamental physics, who will receive awards of $3 million.

photoIn Brief

  • Susan O’Brien to move to UC Irvine Health

  • Rosemarie Henson named senior vice president for prevention and early detection of the American Cancer Society

  • Michael Bishop to receive award from the Van Andel Research Institute

  • Antje Hoering named CEO of Cancer Research and Biostatistics

  • Nancy Hesse named chief nursing officer of Cancer Treatment Centers of America

  • Kathleen Green appointed associate director of basic sciences research at Northwestern University’s Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center

  • Nancy Weigel named editor-in-chief of the journal Hormones and Cancer

  • American Society of Clinical Oncology forms new clinical affairs department

  • Community Oncology Alliance publishes report on closings of cancer clinics

  • Harrington Discovery Institute and University of Oxford form affiliation

  • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Astellas Pharma Inc. announce three-year collaboration

  • AstraZeneca, Pharmacyclics Inc., and Janssen Research & Development LLC to collaborate on MEDI4736 and Imbruvica trials

20141107 - Nov 7, 2014
ISSUE 42 – NOV. 7, 2014PDF

UT System (Again) Directs DePinho to Cure MD Anderson Faculty Angst

Over the past two years, four separate surveys attempted to gauge the level of faculty morale and satisfaction at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

All produced similar results: faculty morale is low, and a large proportion of the faculty says the administration is tone-deaf to their needs. The executive leadership is seen as not appropriately responding to internal issues. 

The latest survey—conducted by the UT System and reported on Nov. 3—allows comparison with the earlier efforts.

The Survey Results

Greenberg: More Work Needs to be Done

After three very similar surveys yielded results that pointed to disaffection and disenfranchisement on the part of the faculty at MD Anderson, the UT System officials said they expect a “renewed, constructive and collaborative effort” to address the problems.

Funding Opportunity

NCI to Host SBIR Investor Forum

NCI is hosting a Small Business Innovation Research Investor Forum Nov. 13 at Agilent Technologies in Santa Clara, Calif., where 28 SBIR-funded companies will present cancer therapeutics, diagnostics, and devices.

photoIn Brief

  • David Nathan receives Lifetime Impact Award from Boston Children’s Hospital

  • Steven Finklestein appointed chief science officer of 21st Century Oncology

  • City of Hope awarded $8 million to launch stem cell therapy clinic

  • American Cancer Society honors researchers at Fox Chase and Temple University 

  • Cancer Innovation Coalition holds policy briefing on Capitol Hill

photoDrugs and Targets

  • Cyramza approved in metastatic stomach cancer

  • Velos and MD Anderson Cancer Center launch investigational drug computer data system

20141031 - Oct 31, 2014
ISSUE 41 – OCT. 31, 2014PDF

How Elite Institutions Were Affected By A Decade of Constricted Funding

The ten-year period of erosion that followed the doubling of the NIH budget has hit some research institutions harder than others.

NIH appropriations figures provide a glimpse of the state of science funding in the U.S., but they don’t shed light on how individual institutions and areas of research are affected.

To conduct an exploratory analysis of levels of funding at specific institutions, The Cancer Letter compiled NIH and NCI funding figures from 2003 to 2013 for eight freestanding cancer centers and nine other research institutions that include cancer centers. A focus on freestanding cancer centers provides a snapshot of funding at institutions engaged primarily in basic and clinical cancer research.

 The Impact of Triple Calamities: Flat Funding, the End of ARRA, and a Dramatic Loss of Purchasing Power

The Cancer Letter asked leaders of cancer centers, professional societies, and science advocacy organizations to comment on declining levels of NIH and NCI funding at freestanding cancer centers and selected academic institutions that include cancer centers.

Guest Editorial
The Academic Difference: George Weiner On How America’s Cancer Centers Are More Valuable Than Ever

“The nation’s academic cancer centers are a national resource that will increase in value as remarkable changes continue in biomedical research, cancer care, and health policy.”

Bennett, Federal Prosecutors Reach $475,000 Settlement

Charles Bennett, an oncologist and cancer researcher whose work focuses on adverse events caused by pharmaceutical products, settled a federal complaint brought by a whistleblower alleging irregularities in the management of R01 research grants administered by Northwestern University. 

Northwestern paid $2.93 million in 2013 to settle allegations of mismanaging five of Bennett’s R01 grants. 

Funding Opportunity
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Launches Myeloid Program

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society launched a program to fund research projects focused on myeloid diseases, such as myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms, both of which can progress to acute myeloid leukemia. 

photoIn Brief

  • City of Hope launches Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute

  • Lisa Richardson named director of CDC Division of Cancer Prevention and Control

  • Milan Mrksich named associate director for research technology and infrastructure at Lurie Cancer Center

  • Ronan Swords receives Pap Corps Endowed Professorship

  • Laura Brod named CEO of GeneSegues Therapeutics

  • Merck Serono names three grant winners

  • Martine Extermann receives top award from International Society of Geriatric Oncology

  • Aptose Biosciences Inc. joins Beat AML consortium

  • Meridian Health and Hackensack University Health Network to discuss merging health systems

  • Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health and Science University launches statewide program

  • American Society of Clinical Oncology endorses AUA/ASTRO Guideline

photoDrugs and Targets

  • FDA extends Lymphoseek label to include mapping in solid tumors

  • National Comprehensive Cancer Network approves VeriStrat predictive proteomics test

  • Myriad Genetics establishes European laboratory

  • Case Medical Center and Seidman Cancer Center select GenomOncology for workflow management

  • Qiagen and Astellas Pharma to collaborate on companion diagnostics

20141024 - Oct 24, 2014
ISSUE 40 – OCT. 24, 2014PDF



40 Years Later
Doctor and Patient Reflect on the Cure

On Oct. 21, 1974, John Cleland lay in a hospital bed at Indiana University Hospital.

At 23, he had just graduated from Purdue University and just married.

He was also three weeks into a fourth-line chemotherapy regimen for advanced metastatic testicular cancer. The disease had spread to his lungs.

Lawrence Einhorn, Cleland’s doctor, told him that this was the end of the road.

Conversation with The Cancer Letter
Einhorn: “I Still Harbor Hope For Similar Success Stories”

The Cancer Letter asked Lawrence Einhorn, distinguished professor of medicine and the Livestrong Foundation Professor of Oncology at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, to reflect on one of the most spectacular successes in the history of cancer research—his development of the curative regimen for testicular cancer.

Caris Life Sciences Lays Off Estimated 20 Percent of Staff

Caris Life Sciences Inc. last week reduced its workforce by 50 people—about 20 percent, sources said.

While a 50-person reduction in force is small by pharma industry standards, the development could be significant because Caris is a key player in the emerging market for molecular therapies.

HRSA: Discounts Owed on Some Orphan Drug Uses

The Health Resources and Services Administration last week warned pharmaceutical companies that they must continue to offer 340B Drug Pricing Program discounts on some uses of orphan drugs.

Cancer Support Community Reports on Patient Experiences

Cancer Support Community released the findings report from the first year-and-a-half of the Cancer Experience Registry.

Institute of Medicine Elects 80 New Members

The Institute of Medicine named 70 new members and 10 foreign associates during its 44th annual meeting.

New members are elected by current active members through a selective process that recognizes individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.

photoIn Brief

  • Benjamin Neel named director of NYU Cancer Center

  • Brad Pollock named chair of public health department at UC Davis

  • Richard Zellars named chair of radiation oncology at IU School of Medicine

  • David Mauro named chief medical officer and VP of Advaxis Inc.

  • James Tulsky receives award from American Cancer Society

  • Mary Kozik named senior director of development at Winship Cancer Institute

  • Northwestern Mutual and Alex’s Lemonade Stand fund eight young investigators

  • Association of Community Cancer Centers receives gift from Bristol-Myers Squibb

  • Stand Up To Cancer epigenetics dream team receives $7.5 million from Van Andel Research Institute

photoDrugs and Targets

  • EU approves Imbruvica in MCL, CLL

  • CMS publishes two draft coverage determinations for molecular prostate cancer tests

  • Priority Health to cover FoundationOne genomic profiles

  • Celgene and Sutro Biopharma to collaborate on antibody-drug conjugates

20141017 - Oct 17, 2014
ISSUE 39 – OCT. 17, 2014PDF



Indiana to Close Proton Beam Facility
Amid Nationwide Building Boom

At its opening a decade ago, the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was one of four such facilities in the U.S.

Alas, money woes struck immediately. The center has run at a deficit for most of its existence—recently losing over $3.5 million in operating costs in fiscal 2013. And now the center is a landmark once again: On Jan. 1, 2015, it will become the first proton beam center in the U.S. to be closed.

Conversation with The Cancer Letter
IU’s Loehrer Discusses “Business Decision” To Close Bloomington Proton Beam Center

The Cancer Letter asked Patrick Loehrer, director of the Indiana University Melvin & Bren Simon Cancer Center, to discuss his institution’s decision to close its 10-year-old proton beam center.

No other institution in the U.S. has closed such a facility. 

Genentech Reps Not Welcome

Hospitals Urge Drug Maker to Reverse Policy

On Supplying Avastin, Rituxan, & Herceptin

Cancer centers and other hospitals, reeling from the loss of discounts and rebates on three widely used cancer drugs, are seeking to persuade drug maker Genentech to reverse its decision to channel these medications through six specialty distributors.

ASCO Endorses Guideline for Molecular Testing

The American Society of Clinical Oncology endorsed a joint clinical practice guideline on molecular testing published by the College of American Pathologists, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and the Association for Molecular Pathology. 

IARC Publishes Fourth Edition of European Code Against Cancer

The fourth edition of the European Code Against Cancer was published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, with the participation of the European Commission. 

Funding Opportunity

Stand Up To Cancer Canada to Fund Two Dream Teams

Stand Up To Cancer Canada will support two, four-year cancer research dream teams with nearly $20 million USD raised by SU2C Canada collaborators and from the charity’s September telecast. The dream teams will focus their research on translational research in breast cancer and cancer stem cells.

photoIn Brief

  • Francis Giles named deputy director of Lurie Cancer Center

  • Zhu Chen honored by American Association for Cancer Research

  • Lili Yang receives $2.3 million award from NIH

  • Indiana University Simon Cancer Center re-designated as NCI cancer center

  • Cancer Treatment Centers of America launch fertility preservation program

  • Lurie Cancer Center to collaborate with Perthera Inc.

  • ASCO publishes survivorship care plan template

photoDrugs and Targets

  • FDA approves Velcade in mantle cell lymphoma

  • Priority Review granted to lenvatinib in thyroid cancer

  • Blinatumomab granted Priority Review in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

20141010 - Oct 10, 2014
ISSUE 38 – OCT. 10, 2014PDF



NCI Failed to Publish Two Bypass Budgets

As Funds Tightened and Sequestration Set In

What’s the NCI director’s professional judgment of opportunities in cancer research at a time of shrinking budgets, sequestration and conclusion of the windfall of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act?

Under ordinary circumstances, this question wouldn’t have required a mind reader. The NCI director has an authority no other government executive enjoys: every year, he submits a summary of scientific opportunities directly to the White House, bypassing review by the NIH director and officials at the place ominously called “Downtown,” the brutalist-style HHS headquarters at the base of Capitol Hill.

Guest Editorial
Andrew Vickers on PSA Skepticism, Rational and Irrational

I consider myself a prostate cancer screening skeptic. For example, in the title of the grand rounds lecture I have given for many years, I describe PSA as a “public health fiasco.”

I have also gone on the record to state: “PSA testing as it is commonly practiced in the U.S. is indefensible.”

UT Board Announces Support for MD Anderson Tenure System

The University of Texas System Board of Regents has—in response to the threat of censure by an external group—voted to continue support of MD Anderson Cancer Center’s seven-year term tenure system.

Study: Drug Discounts Used For Wealthier Patients In Many 340B-Enrolled Hospitals

Hospitals that qualified for the 340B drug pricing program in 2004 or later were more likely to serve wealthier communities with higher rates of health insurance coverage, according to a study published Oct. 6 in the journal Health Affairs.

The primary purpose of the 340B program—established by Congress in 1992—was to provide significantly discounted outpatient drugs to low-income and uninsured patients.

photoIn Brief

  • ESMO Names Annual Award Winners
  • Phoenix Children’s Hospital launches The Chan Soon-Shiong Children’s Precision Medicine Institute
  • C. Parker Gibbs Jr. appointed deputy director of medical affairs for the University of Florida Health Cancer Center.
  • MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy launches fellowship program
  • Ohio State University completes five-year pharmaceuticals center project
  • MD Anderson and VolitionRx Limited announce collaboration
  • Andrew Brenner receives $1.62 million grant from FDA
photoDrugs and Targets

  • Akynzeo approved for chemotherapy-related nausea
  • DNX-2401 granted orphan drug designation
  • Caris Life Sciences launches pilot program through the U.K. National Health Service
  • Mayo Clinic partners with Second Genome Inc.
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb and MD Anderson collaborate on immunotherapies
  • PhRMA Report details nearly 800 cancer therapies currently in development
20141003 - Oct 3, 2014
ISSUE 37 – OCT. 3, 2014PDF



Genentech Move Nixes Hospital Discounts

Avastin, Herceptin, Rituxan Now Sold Under Tighter Control by Drug Maker

A move by Genentech has eliminated discounts and rebates hospitals receive when they purchase three of the company’s top-selling infused cancer drugs.

Beginning Oct. 1, hospitals can now order Avastin (bevacizumab), Herceptin (trastuzumab) and Rituxan (rituximab) exclusively from six specialty distributors authorized by the drug maker.

Genentech said the move will bypass more than 80 full-line wholesale drug distribution centers, with the objective of enhancing efficiency and security of the supply chain for these widely used medications. 

Conversation with The Cancer Letter
Scott Soefje: “These are Life-Saving Drugs. I’m Not Going To Stop Treating Patients, Right?”

The loss of discounts and rebates hospitals received for administering Genentech’s Avastin, Herceptin and Rituxan will increase costs to patients, said Scott Soefje, director of pharmacy at University Medical Center Brackenridge in Austin.

Fake Avastin, Paid for by Medicare, Administered to U.S. Patients

Two years ago, British authorities tested a shipment of chemotherapy drugs headed for North America. 

They found that the agent, labeled as Genentech’s Avastin, contained no trace of Avastin’s active ingredient. The drugs were on the way to Canada, where they were to be sold to doctors throughout the U.S.

Gonzalez-Angulo To Serve 10 Years In Poisoning Case

Ana Maria Gonzalez-Angulo, a 43-year-old oncologist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, was sentenced to 10 years in prison for poisoning her lover and colleague George Blumenschein.

The sentence, issued Sept. 29, makes Gonzalez-Angulo ineligible for probation, but under Texas law, she will be eligible for parole in 5 years.

FDA Publishes Two Guidances for Lab-Developed Tests

FDA published two draft guidance documents Oct. 3 for regulatory oversight, notification and medical device reporting for laboratory developed tests.

Groups Push for CMS Coverage for LDCT Lung Screening

A coalition of patient advocacy and medical organizations urged the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to cover low-dose computed tomography for Medicare patients at high risk for lung cancer.

Funding Opportunity
NYC-based Research Alliance Offering $200,000 Per Year for Young Investigators

The Pershing Square Sohn Cancer Research Alliance is taking applications for its Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research. The prize of $200,000 per year for up to three years is awarded annually to five New York City-based scientists.

photoIn Brief

  • Leonidas Platanias named director of Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center

  • Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State sign new affiliation agreement

  • Robert Miller named medical director of ASCO Institute of Quality

  • MD Anderson Cancer Center receives $10 million from ExxonMobil

  • Jan Egberts appointed CEO of Agendia Inc.

  • Memorial Sloan Kettering to open largest suburban location

  • CancerCare receives $1.5 million from Susan G. Komen

20140926 - Sep 26, 2014
ISSUE 36 – SEPT. 26, 2014PDF



Colorado Institutions Vying to Build First Carbon Ion Center in the U.S.

The University of Colorado and Colorado State University are vying to become the first institution to build a carbon-ion radiotherapy research and treatment facility in the U.S. The treatment modality is available in Europe and Japan.

Officials at the two universities are exploring the feasibility of building a $300 million research and treatment facility at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.

Their first step is to conduct a $200,000 feasibility study for the project.

Conversation with The Cancer Letter
Pat White: NIH Funding “Our Only Concern”

A lobbying campaign will make an effort to secure an immediate, significant funding increase for NIH.

The effort, called ACT for NIH: Advancing Cures Today, seeks to bring together patients, scientists, advocates, and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. Their objective is to demonstrate the impact of a decade of clamping down on NIH funding. Adjusted for inflation, NIH receives nearly 25 percent less funding than it did in 2003.

Gonzalez-Angulo Found Guilty in MD Anderson Poisoning Case

HOUSTON—Ana Maria Gonzalez-Angulo, a 43-year-old breast cancer specialist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, was found guilty of poisoning her lover, George Blumenschein, another medical oncologist at MD Anderson.

A jury at the Harris County 248th District Criminal Court found Gonzalez-Angulo guilty of aggravated assault Sept. 26. The court immediately went into the penalty phase of the proceedings.

Guest Editorial
“Gizmo Idolatry” and Marketing Da Vinci’s Radical Robot

In America, cutting-edge inventions are seen as the gateway to the future. However, the hazard of credulously accepting new technology into medical practice was warned against in a 2008 Journal of the American Medical Association editorial “Gizmo Idolatry.”

The term “gizmo idolatry” describes the conviction that a high-tech approach is better than a low-tech approach, even if there’s no evidence to support that view. A glaring example of medical “gizmo idolatry” is the da Vinci Surgical System. Without credible data to prove its safety and benefit in complex surgeries, this costly robotic machine has been promoted into near ubiquitous use in hospitals across the nation. 

MD Anderson Expands Reach Into Florida, Ohio

Two institutions said they are in varying stages of completing partnerships with MD Anderson Cancer Center.

The two deals are a part of an expansion strategy that essentially means that the MD Anderson logo can light up almost anywhere, establishing the Houston-based cancer center as a potential competitor to almost any cancer center in the U.S.

NCI Starts “Exceptional Responders” Study

NCI has launched a pilot study to investigate the molecular factors of tumors associated with exceptional treatment responses of cancer patients to drug therapies.

The Exceptional Responders Initiative seeks to identify the molecular features of tumors that predict whether a particular drug or class of drugs will be beneficial. 

photoIn Brief

  • Doug Ulman named CEO of Pelotonia

  • Margaret Foti honored by Friends of Cancer Research

  • Wilshire Oncology Medical Group joins City of Hope

  • The West Clinic receives National Committee for Quality Assurance recognition

  • FDA awards Critical Path Institute $2.1 million

  • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Cancer Genetics Inc. enter collaboration

  • FASEB publishes factsheet on federal research funding by congressional district

  • Lisa Stockmon named City of Hope chief communications officer 

  • FDA names recipients Drug Shortage Assistance Award

  • European Head and Neck Society calls for EU program

  • QVC and Fashion Footwear Association of New York present $240,000 to University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute

20140919 - Sep 19, 2014
ISSUE 35 – SEPT. 19, 2014PDF



DePinho Will Not Meet With AAUP In Probe of Tenure Denial Dispute 

MD Anderson Cancer Center President Ronald DePinho declined to meet with the investigation committee dispatched by the American Association of University Professors to his institution Thursday.

“We will not personally meet with representatives of a non-governing entity conducting an unauthorized investigation with a pre-determined outcome.” DePinho wrote in a Sept. 17 email to MD Anderson faculty and staff.

 

Officials: Poisoning Unrelated to MD Anderson;

Critics Allege Dysfunction in Handling of Affair

Images of the gleaming buildings and the distinctive logo of MD Anderson Cancer Center have been flashing on television screens and appearing on pages of respectable newspapers and scandal sheets alike.

The reason has nothing to do with the Moon Shots aimed at curing cancers. Rather, the name of the venerable cancer center is being dragged through the mud because one of its doctors stands accused of trying to poison another.

Sept. 9 NCAB Meeting
Varmus: Expect Another CR For Funding The NIH Through Mid-December

NCI Director Harold Varmus said Congress is moving slowly on appropriations bills, and a continuing resolution lasting until December is the best that can be expected in the short term.

“Depending on the outcome of the election in November, there may be an interest among the Republicans that if they regain the Senate that this should be postponed until after they’re back in charge in both sides of the bicameral legislature,” Varmus said at the Sept. 9 meeting of the National Cancer Advisory Board.

AACR 2014 Cancer Progress Report:

More Federal Funds Needed

The American Association for Cancer Research published its 2014 Cancer Progress Report Sept. 16, highlighting the need for greater federal investments in biomedical research. 

The report is a “comprehensive educational tool that chronicles the progress that has been made against cancer…and calls on the administration and Congress to prioritize the growth of the NIH and NCI budgets,” according to AACR.

Funding Opportunities
AACR Accepting Submissions for Two Dream Team Grants

The American Association for Cancer Research is accepting submissions of ideas to two dream team grants: one offering $20 million for lung cancer research, and one for $6 million for ovarian cancer research.

Funding for the lung cancer research grant will be provided by Stand Up To Cancer, the American Cancer Society and Bristol-Myers Squibb. The ovarian cancer research grant provides funding over three years, and is sponsored by Stand Up To Cancer, the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance, and the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.

photoIn Brief

  • David Tweardy named head of internal medicine at MD Anderson

  • Dan Glickman named to ACS Cancer Action Network board of directors

  • Memorial Sloan Kettering begins construction on 285,000-square-foot outpatient center in Middletown, N.J.

  • Boehringer Ingelheim and CureVac announce collaboration.

  • Soligenix Inc. reaches phase III protocol agreement with FDA

  • Sutro Biopharma and Merck KGaA form ADC collaboration

  • Denovo Biopharma acquires enzastaurin rights from Eli Lilly & Co. 

  • Leukemia and Lymphoma Society partners with OncoPep

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