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March 2016PDF

 

 

Leukemia

Vyxeos Injection Improves Overall Survival In Phase III Acute Myeloid Leukemia Trial

A phase III trial of Vyxeos Liposome for Injection demonstrated statistically significant improvements in overall survival in patients with high-risk secondary acute myeloid leukemia.

The median overall survival for patients treated with Vyxeos (cytarabine: daunorubicin) in the study was 9.56 months compared to 5.95 months for patients receiving the standard of care regimen of cytarabine and daunorubicin known as 7+3.

The hazard ratio was 0.69 (p=0.005) which represents a 31 percent reduction in the risk of death versus 7+3, according to Celator Pharmaceuticals Inc., the drug’s sponsor, which plans to submit the data for presentation at the 2016 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Atezolizumab Immunotherapy Boosts OS Compared to Docetaxel in Phase II Trial

Patients with advanced metastatic lung cancer treated with atezolizumab, a targeted immunotherapy drug, lived significantly longer and with fewer side effects than those who received docetaxel chemotherapy, according to a study published in The Lancet.

“The results of this study demonstrate that the use of atezolizumab, a monoclonal antibody, improves the survival rate of a majority of lung cancer patients who have progressive cancer when used after first-line chemotherapy,”

Also:

 Drugs and Targets

FDA Approves Imbruvica in First-Line CLL

FDA approved Imbruvica (ibrutinib) as a first-line treatment for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

The approval is based on data from the randomized, multi-center, open-label phase III RESONATE-2 trial, which evaluated the use of Imbruvica versus chlorambucil in 269 treatment-naïve patients with CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma aged 65 years or older. The data were previously presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in December 2015 and also published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Also:

Ovarian Cancer

Study: Reolysin-Paclitaxel Combination Demonstrates Higher Response Than Paclitaxel Therapy Alone

 Glioblastoma

Tocagen Expands Phase II/III Trial, Begins Enrolling in Canada

 Cachexia

Two Phase III Anamorelin Trials Show Improved Lean Body Mass

 NCI CTEP-Approved Trials for the Month of March
20160331 - Mar. 31, 2016
ISSUE 12 – MARCH 25, 2016PDF



Clifford Hudis Named CEO of ASCO

Clifford Hudis was named CEO of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Hudis, who served as ASCO president in 2013 and 2014, is chief of Breast Medicine Service as well as vice president for government relations and chief advocacy officer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Hudis, 56, will start the job at the society’s headquarters in Alexandria, Va., June 27. He will succeed Allen Lichter, who is retiring after having held that job for ten years.

 

NEJM Editors: There Will Be No Clarification For Disputed Power Morcellation Story

The New England Journal of Medicine said it stands by the story that has triggered investigations of a potential breach of patient confidentiality.

In a paper that criticized FDA’s regulatory actions that effectively ended power morcellation in gynecology, Lisa Rosenbaum, an NEJM national correspondent, made a statement that some readers interpreted as suggesting that she had access to confidential patient information (The Cancer Letter, March 18).

Rosenbaum is a cardiologist at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, the institution where Amy Reed—a patient who brought national attention to the harm associated with the procedure—underwent her ill-fated hysterectomy. 

Slamming the Door

Part IX – “Furnituregate”

I first heard something about a red sofa that cost an impressive amount of money soon after I started to cover the controversy at the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

The sofa, I was told, was to be purchased with MD Anderson funds for the office of Lynda Chin. I wanted to look into it, but I want to look into many things, and some take precedence over others. This seemed to be fun, but it was undeniably trivial.

The sofa in question was intended for the same entity CPRIT was being asked to fund. Had I been able to get it through my thick skull that the furniture was a part of the same story that was causing the ungluing of CPRIT, I would have filed my freedom of information requests sooner.

NCCN Launches Evidence Blocks as Part of its Guidelines

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network launched its value tool, NCCN Evidence Blocks, which will be presented at its annual conference, March 31 to April 2.

NCCN has published two additional resources since its 2015 meeting: the NCCN Framework and the NCCN Quick Guide Series for patients.

In Brief
  • Maha Hussain joins Northwestern University Lurie Cancer Center

  • Jean-Yves Douillard appointed chief medical officer of ESMO

  • Karmanos promotes five scientific staff members

  • Jennifer Pietenpol receives award from T.J. Martell Foundation
  • Pediatric Oncologist Dennis Hughes pleads guilty to collecting child pornography

  • American Cancer Society receives $1.58 million grant from The Merck Foundation

  • MD Anderson submits plan to comply with Texas “Campus Carry” gun law 

  • The Cancer Letter’s coverage of power morcellation named a finalist in the 2015 Best in Business Awards for Outstanding Business Journalism
Drugs and Targets
  • FDA Approves Roche Hepatits C RNA Test

  • UPenn and Genisphere form photodynamic therapy collaboration

 

20160325 - Mar. 25, 2016
ISSUE 11 – MARCH 18, 2016PDF



Brigham Doc’s NEJM Paper Decries Morcellation’s Demise—Did She Get Confidential Patient Information?

Clearly, Lisa Rosenbaum wanted to trigger a heated discussion—but not of the sort she ended up with.

Rosenbaum, a national correspondent at the New England Journal of Medicine, focused on the demise of power morcellation, a once widely used gynecological procedure, which in some cases ended up disseminating undetected uterine sarcomas.

In a paper published in the March 10 issue of the journal and titled “N-of-1 Policymaking—Tragedy, Trade-offs, and the Demise of Morcellation,” Rosenbaum alleges that Amy Reed, a high-profile opponent of power morcellation, had stage IV cancer before her hysterectomy.

Capitol Hill

Senate Bill Gives FDA More Control Over Its Hiring, Salaries and Structure

The FDA and NIH Workforce Authorities Modernization Act was introduced in the Senate by Republican and Democratic leaders of the health committee. The bill aims to help FDA and NIH “attract top talent during this exciting time in science.”

The bill, introduced by Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.), looks to improve coordination within and between FDA medical product centers and allow the FDA to update its structure, as well as make it easier for the agency to hire; improve access to scientific meetings for federal employees; and streamline processes for NIH research information collection.

Slamming the Door

Part VIII – A Conversation with DePinho

The $18 million never made it from Austin to Houston.

MD Anderson’s initial stance was to deflect all CPRIT-related questions to CPRIT, but this didn’t make the controversy go away. So, the cancer center suggested that the grant undergo scientific review, as well as commercial.

Recently, I asked Dan Fontaine, MD Anderson’s executive chief of staff why the money never changed hands.

Bunn Wins ASCO Karnofsky Award; Kaelin to Receive Science of Oncology Award

The American Society of Clinical Oncology announced the winners of its highest honors, the Special Awards, to be presented during the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting in June.

“The exceptional accomplishments of each of our awardees reflect their exemplary dedication to furthering cancer research and serving as a beacon of hope to the cancer community,” said Peter Paul Yu, immediate past president of ASCO and chair of the Special Awards Selection Committee. “It is our honor to recognize their enduring contributions with ASCO’s most prestigious awards.”

Obituaries

UNMC Radiologist Glenn Dalrymple, 81;

and MSKCC Researcher Robert Golbey, 93

Glenn Dalrymple, a radiology professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center from 1990 to 1996, died March 9 in Omaha after a long battle with colon cancer. He was 81.

 

In Brief
  • Itai Yanai to Lead New Institute at NYU Langone

  • Debra Patt named Editor-in-Chief of JCO Clinical Cancer Informatics 

  • Jennie Crews elected president of Association of Community Cancer Centers

  • Charles Serhan receives Ross Prize from Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
  • American Society of Clinical Oncology publishes State of Cancer Care 2016

  • V Foundation and WWE announce research funding partnership 

  • Providence Health & Services and Institute for Systems Biology 

Drugs and Targets
  • Gilead Halts 6 Zydelig Trials As FDA, EMA Warn of Deaths From Respiratory Infections

  • FDA Grants Orphan Designation to VAL-083

  • FDA Grants Priority Review to Atezolizumab

 

20160318 - Mar. 18, 2016