publication date: Jun. 21, 2019

Clinical Roundup Study finds one in six cancer survivors reported pain restricting daily functioning

A new report finds about one in three cancer survivors (34.6%) reported having chronic pain, representing nearly 5.4 million cancer survivors in the U.S. The report, appearing as a Research Letter in JAMA Oncology, finds one in six survivors (16%), representing about 2.5 million people in the U.S., reported suffering from high impact chronic pain that restricts daily functioning. Those rates are about double the rates in the general population.

Chronic pain is one of the most common long-term effects of cancer treatment and has been linked with an impaired quality of life, lower adherence to treatment, and higher health care costs. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information regarding the prevalence of, and risk factors for, the development of chronic pain among cancer survivors.

To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of pain in cancer survivors and help inform future health care priorities and policies, investigators led by Changchuan Jiang of Mount Sinai Hospital, with researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, University of Virginia, and the American Cancer Society investigated the prevalence of chronic pain among cancer survivors in the U.S. using data from the National Health Interview Survey (2016-2017).

The survey collects information related to chronic pain (pain on … Continue reading Study finds one in six cancer survivors reported pain restricting daily functioning

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Copyright (c) 2018 The Cancer Letter Inc.