publication date: Aug. 3, 2018

Clinical Roundup Study identifies genes associated with risk for triple negative breast cancer

A study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute has identified specific genes associated with increased risk for triple-negative breast cancer, providing the basis for better risk management.

Germline genetic testing can identify women at increased risk of breast cancer by evaluating if there are genetic changes, often inherited from a parent, that increase the risk of certain cancers. However, it has been difficult to identify women at elevated risk of triple-negative breast cancer because only inherited mutations in BRCA1 have been linked to this subtype of breast cancer.

Researchers performed genetic testing on 10,901 triple-negative breast cancer patients from two studies. For 8753 patients, 21 genes were tested, and for the remaining 2148 patients, 17 genes were tested.

Among the genes tested, researchers found that alternations in BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, and RAD51D genes were associated with high risk for triple-negative breast cancer and greater than 20 percent lifetime risk for overall breast cancer among Caucasians. Researchers observed a similar trend among African Americans. In addition, mutations in BRIP1 and RAD51Cwere linked to more moderate risks of triple-negative disease.

This study is the first to establish which genes are associated with high lifetime risks of triple-negative breast cancer. While previous studies have … Continue reading Study identifies genes associated with risk for triple negative breast cancer

To access this members-only content, please log in.
If you're not a subscriber why not join today?
If you believe you should be able to view this area but cannot log in, then please contact us and we will try to rectify this issue as soon as possible.
To gain access to the members only content click here to subscribe.
You will be given immediate access to premium content on the site.
Click here to join.

Copyright (c) 2018 The Cancer Letter Inc.