publication date: Jul. 28, 2017
Issue 30 - Jul. 28, 2017
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  • Pediatric MATCH starts to accrue children with recurrent and refractory cancers

    NCI and the Children’s Oncology Group opened enrollment in Pediatric Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice—Pediatric MATCH—a long-awaited precision medicine trial.

    Pediatric MATCH, a series of single-arm phase II trials, will seek to screen between 200 and 300 patients per year, with the goal of screening 1,000 patients over four years, assigning children to therapies that target genomic characteristics of their diseases.

  • Conversation with The Cancer Letter

    Will Parsons: This is a fantastic opportunity to test precision oncology for pediatric patients in a large-scale way

    Though NCI-MATCH and Pediatric MATCH are similar in structure, they represent different approaches to oncology.

    While a small minority of adult cancer patients in the U.S. get treated on-protocol, in pediatric oncology only a small proportion of patients receive care off-protocol. Altogether 90 percent of childhood cancer patients are treated at institutions that are part of Children’s Oncology Group.

  • Conversation with The Cancer Letter

    Rita Redberg: FDA proposal to delay reporting of device malfunctions “should be tossed”

    A recent proposal to delay reporting of device malfunctions to FDA will weaken the already inadequate medical device reporting system at the agency, said Rita Redberg, a professor of medicine and cardiologist at the University of California San Francisco.

    Redberg, editor of JAMA Internal Medicine, has been studying adverse event reporting and medical device surveillance issues for over a decade. She often opines on recommendations of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, and in 2014, as chair of an advisory committee for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Redberg presided over the panel that expressed low confidence in low-dose CT screening for lung cancer (The Cancer Letter, May 9, 2014).

  • In Brief

    • Carlos Arteaga to head UT Southwestern Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center
    • Larry Copeland appointed president of GOG Foundation
    • Edith Mitchell receives 2017 ASTRO Honorary Membership
    • SU2C-Lustgarten Foundation team aims to apply CAR T-cell therapy to pancreatic cancer
    • Andrew Baschnagel wins UW Carbone Cancer Center award for lung cancer study
    • Cancer groups release statement on health disparities research
    • Report shows cancer patients struggle to afford treatment
    • Christiana Care Gene Editing Institute, NovellusDx form personalized medicine partnership
  • Drugs and Targets

    • FDA expands approval of Yervoy to include pediatric patients 12 years and older with unresectable or metastatic melanoma
    • FDA accepts BMS applications for Opdivo four-week dosing schedule across approved indications
    • Novartis receives positive CHMP opinion for Rydapt for newly diagnosed FLT3-mutated AML, three types of advanced systemic mastocytosis
    • AstraZeneca and Merck from oncology collaboration
    • CHMP issues positive opinion for avelumab for metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma

Copyright (c) 2017 The Cancer Letter Inc.