publication date: Sep. 12, 2014
20140912 - Sep. 12, 2014
ISSUE 34 – SEPT. 12, 2014PDF



Group Chairs Seek Role Running NCTN

Is the new National Clinical Trials Network set up for success or heading for failure?

The National Cancer Advisory Board Sept. 9 attempted to review the early signals coming from the institute’s revamped clinical trials system to determine whether it could use early tweaks. 

The institute’s new network, configured to conduct new-generation “smart” trials of targeted agents, creates new mandates and capabilities, but—overall—it provides no new money to the clinical trials system. 

Also:


Tobacco Interests Contribute a Portion Of the $109 Million Raised by Stand Up To Cancer

Stand Up To Cancer More, a non-profit cancer group that conducts televised fundraising events, raised over $109 million last weekend.

The group’s triumphant Sept. 7 press release, awash with pictures of participating Hollywood celebrities, hailed this achievement. However, the group also became a target for criticism for failing to mention that three high-level donors have ties to the tobacco industry.

SU2C officials aren’t denying the connection.

Guest Editorial
Learning from the Power Morcellation Fiasco:
Government Must Do More to Regulate Devices

Following our discovery that my wife’s occult uterine cancer was morcellated using a gynecological power morcellator, we initiated a vigorous campaign to protect others from this avoidable harm. 

It is now increasingly clear that one in 350-500 women with symptomatic fibroids have occult or missed uterine cancer lurking in what a majority of gynecological surgeons have assumed to be benign tumors. 

AACR Urges FDA to Regulate High Risk Lab-Developed Tests

The American Association for Cancer Research urged FDA to regulate high-risk laboratory-developed tests, a category of assays that has escaped scrutiny because of loopholes in the regulatory process.

Normally, FDA requires that diagnostic tests developed by manufacturers adhere to three measures: analytic validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. However, laboratories can get around this requirement by using laboratory-developed tests, or LDTs.

Funding Opportunity
PanCAN Offering $4.1 Million in Research Grants

The American Association for Cancer Research urged FDA to regulate high-risk laboratory-developed tests, a category of assays that has escaped scrutiny because of loopholes in the regulatory process.

Normally, FDA requires that diagnostic tests developed by manufacturers adhere to three measures: analytic validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. However, laboratories can get around this requirement by using laboratory-developed tests, or LDTs.

photoIn Brief

  • Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announce 2014 award winners

  • Andreas Hochhaus and Robert Gale named editors-in-chief of Leukemia

  • Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center receives five-year p30 Cancer Center Support Grant

  • Louis DeGennaro named president and CEO of Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

  • Stanford University launches genetics and genomics certificate program

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